"Taken"

Fine art photography compositing by Craig Boehman.


"Taken" is meant to me taken on quite a literal level for me. This edit marks the first time I've not used a single lick of my own photography work for a composite piece. There are five images licensed from Envato Elements incorporated here along with three additional textures from the same.


This was an experiment for me on several fronts. The first and big one being, how would I feel about using other people's work for a creative piece, even when legally licensed? The answer prior to beginning and even now is, I don't like the feeling one bit, if I'm to be completely frank. I can't help but to compare the situation to a time during the 6th Grade when I cheated on my history writing project: all I did was basically re-word text lifted from an encyclopedia. Granted, that had not been technically legal and definitely not ethical on my part (and I'm willing to bet my teacher knew and let it slide). As a photographer, and one who prides himself on going out and creating his own work from scratch, this was an exercise in freedom or maybe simply letting go of the way I normally work. I don't want people here to think I look down on the practice of using other people's work (or "assets") for their creative composites - this isn't the point of my long-winded caption. In fact, I come from a background of poetry originally and admire certain poets like William S. Burroughs, who's often cited as one of more popular practitioners of the cut-up technique in poetry. Kurt Cobain of Nirvana was also known to make heavy use of the cut-up technique in his lyrics. Basically: using other people's stuff for a new creation.

So why shouldn't visual artists be excluded from the practice? Well, I don't think it's really been a nagging question for many of us here. But how does everyone feel about this? And maybe more to the point, will those of us who are initially adverse to using other people's work ever "get over it"? Serious question. What's your take on it?



© 2019-2020 By Craig Boehman

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